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Embraer E-Jet E190/E195

Posted on December 09 2021

Embraer E-Jet E190/E195 user+1@localho… Thu, 12/09/2021 - 21:17

The E-Jet series is a family of regional jets (RJ) produced by Brazilian manufacturer Embraer S.A., a series that includes the E190 and E195. Based on the ERJ 190 type, the variants of the ERJ 190-100 are marketed as the E190, while the ERJ 190-200 uses the E195 commercial designation. Launched by Embraer at the 1999 Paris Air Show, the first flight of an E-Jet— an E190, Serial No. 19000001 and registered as PP-XMA—took place on March 12, 2004, from the company’s facilities in Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. Following the completion of its flight-test program, the first three E190 variants—the ERJ 190-100 STD, LR and IGW—were certified by the Brazilian National Civil Aviation Agency [Agencia Nacional de Aviacao Civil (ANAC)] on Aug. 30, 2005. Following the certification of those variants of the ERJ 190-100, a further two—the ERJ 190-100 ECJ and SR—were certified in 2007 and 2010, respectively. In contrast to the E190, all three variants marketed as the E195—the ERJ 190-200 STD, LR and IGW—were certified on the same day in June 2006.

Subsequent to the program’s 1999 launch, March 2004 first flight and August 2005 certification, the first E190 was delivered to launch customer JetBlue Airways on Sep. 13, 2005, following that airline’s June 2003 launch order for 100 of the type. Ultimately, 60 E190s were delivered to JetBlue, with the first revenue flight of this E-Jet variant taking place between Boston and New York JFK on Nov. 8, 2005. However, following an evaluation by the company of potential 100-seat replacements, JetBlue announced on July 10, 2018, that it had placed an order for 60 A220-300 airframes that would replace the company’s existing fleet of E190s.

Beyond the first-generation E190 and E195, second-generation variants of both airframes—dubbed the E190-E2 and E195-E2—were announced by Embraer at the 2013 Paris Air Show alongside the updated E175-E2. The first flights of the E190-E2 and E195-E2 took place on May 23, 2016, and March 29, 2017, with those first flights performed by airframes registered as PR-ZEY and PR-ZIJ, respectively.

According to Embraer, the May 2016 first flight of the E190-E2 took place ahead of schedule, as that flight “was originally scheduled to take place during the second half of [that] year.” That flight—which lasted 3 hr. 20 min. and evaluated the airplane’s “handling and performance characteristics”—took place three months after that E2 variant was rolled out in February 2016. Following the certification of the E190-E2 in February 2018, the first delivery took place on April 4, 2018, to Norwegian carrier Wideroe Airlines, an airframe that was registered as LN-WEA and which also represented the first E-Jet E2 to be delivered. The first revenue flight of that variant was operated by Wideroe on April 24, 2018, between the Norwegian cities of Bergen and Tromso. Much like the E190-E2, the E195-E2 received simultaneous approval from the ANAC, European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and FAA in April 2019, with the first delivery taking place on Sept. 12, 2019, to Brazilian carrier Azul Linhas Aereas Brasileiras S.A. That delivery—of an airplane registered as PR-PJN—marked the first of 51 E195-E2 airframes that Azul had on order at the time.

Regardless of any differences between the variants of the E-Jet series, the type certificate for all variants of the ERJ 190 is held by Yabora Industria Aeronautica S.A. of Sao Jose dos Campos, a certificate that was formerly held by Embraer S.A.

E-Jet Series Variant

Brazilian (ANAC) Certification Date

E-Jet Series Variant

Brazilian (ANAC) Certification Date

ERJ 190-100 STD

Aug. 30, 2005

ERJ 190-200 STD

June 30, 2006

ERJ 190-100 LR

ERJ 190-200 LR

ERJ 190-100 IGW

ERJ 190-200 IGW

ERJ 190-100 ECJ

Oct. 30, 2007

ERJ 190-300

Feb. 28, 2018

ERJ 190-100 SR

Jan. 21, 2010

ERJ 190-400

April 15, 2019

Cabin Configurations, Passenger Capacity and Cargo Capacities/Volume

From a passenger capacity standpoint, the variants of the first-generation E190 can accommodate either 98 or 114 passengers, with three of the ERJ 190-100 variants—the STD, LR and IGW—certified to the latter capacity figure. For those variants, that maximum certified capacity is possible in what Embraer describes as a high-density configuration, with seats that have a pitch of 29 in. or 30 in. Another single-class configuration option for the E190 is advertised as having 100 seats with a 31-in. or 32-in. pitch in a 2 X 2 layout—the economy class layout of all E190 and E195 variants—while a possible dual-class configuration accommodates 96 seats (eight with a 38-in. pitch and 88 with a 31-in. pitch). In contrast to the capacity limits of the ERJ 190-100 STD, LR and IGW, the ERJ 190-100 SR has a reduced maximum capacity of 98 passengers. Supplementing the space in the cabin, Embraer states that the maximum cargo volume of the E190 is 799.18 ft.3, with the respective maximum loads of the forward and aft cargo compartments listed as 4,078 lb. and 3,638 lb.

The larger E195 is able to carry more passengers than the E190, with all variants of the ERJ 190-200 certified to seat 124 passengers. As is the case with the E190, the variants of the E195 are able to accommodate that maximum passenger seating capacity in a high-density configuration, with that configuration having seats with a 29-31-in. pitch in a 2 X 2 layout. An alternative single-class configuration for the E195 accommodates 116 seats that have a 31-in. or 32-in. pitch, while a possible dual-class configuration reduces the capacity to 100 passengers. That dual-class configuration is promoted as having 12 seats with a 42-in. pitch—in a 1 X 2 layout—and 88 seats that have a 33-in. pitch. Supplementing the increased passenger capacity of the E195 are increases in the maximum cargo volume, as well as the maximum loads of the forward and aft cargo compartments. The cargo volume is increased to 897 ft.3, while the forward and aft cargo compartments are able to accommodate up to 4,189 lb. and 3,968 lb., respectively.

Because the fuselage of the E190-E2 retains the same length as the first-generation airframe, it also retains the same 114-passenger maximum capacity. According to Embraer, that capacity is possible in a cabin that features seats in a 2 X 2 layout with a 29-in. pitch. An alternative single-class layout for this E2 variant reduces capacity to 106 passengers, while increasing pitch to 31 in. A potential three-class arrangement further reduces passenger capacity to 97, with nine of those seats having a pitch of 36 in. A further 20 seats have a 34-in. pitch, while the remaining 68 seats reduce the pitch to 31 in. In contrast to the E190-E2, the nearly 10-ft. extension of the E195-E2’s fuselage allowed for passenger capacity to be increased—in comparison to the first-generation E195—from 124 to 146, with that capacity accommodated in seats that have a 28-in. pitch. When passenger seating capacity is reduced to 132 in a single-class configuration, the pitch is increased to 31 in., while a possible three-class layout promoted by Embraer seats 120 passengers. In that latter configuration, 12 of the 120 passengers are accommodated in a cabin that features seats with a 36-in. pitch, while a further 24 seats reduce that pitch to 34 in. and an additional 84 seats have a 31-in. pitch.

Avionics

Despite the differences in dimensions and passenger capacity, there are a significant number of commonalities shared by the E190 and E195, including the type rating necessary for pilots. In terms of avionics, the first-generation versions of those airframes are equipped with Honeywell’s Primus Epic integrated avionics system—which includes five 8 X 10-in. displays—while the E190-E2 and E195-E2 incorporate the company’s Primus Epic 2 system that is promoted by Embraer for its “advanced graphics capabilities” and the size of its landscape displays, as well as for its Next-Generation Flight Management System (NGFMS). The benefits of the NGFMS—which, in addition to being included in the Primus Epic 2 installation on the E2 series of E-Jets, was also made available on first-generation E-Jets—include “support [for] optimized flight profiles, a ‘cost index’ to cut fuel burn, Honeywell’s ‘smart landing’ system, which reduces runway excursions, and compliance [with] required navigation performance [RNP] standards of 0.1 nm.” The five 8 X 10-in. displays on the first-generation E190/E195 have been replaced by four 13 X 10-in. displays on the E2, while both the first and second-generation E-Jet airframes are able to be equipped with optional dual head-up displays (HUD). For pilots transitioning from the first-generation E190/E195 to the E2 variants, the required training time is 2.5 days, a reduction that was made possible because “Embraer did not take advantage of all the technical possibilities of full FBW [fly-by-wire], but instead made the new system mirror the behavior of the [first-generation] E1.”

Supplementing the E2’s upgraded avionics is an updated FBW flight-control system that was developed by Embraer and described by the manufacturer as being a fourth-generation, closed-loop system. While the open-loop FBW system found on the first-generation E-Jets controls pitch and yaw, the E2 airframes have a full FBW system that “offers full envelope protection in all phases of flight” and which has two modes: normal and direct. In contrast to the first E-Jet variants—which were “designed conventionally and an FWB [system] was added”—the E2’s FBW system was integrated “into the design from the beginning,” an approach that provided a number of benefits. Those benefits include enabling the removal of weight from the wing structure thanks to the increased use of the ailerons, with the FBW system also allowing the wings to be moved “somewhat forward and the center of gravity envelope backward.”

Mission and Performance

As can be seen in the table below, there are a number of airframes that are comparable to the E190 and E195 in terms of passenger capacity and range, including Airbus’ A220 series—which was designed and developed by Bombardier, and formerly known as the C Series—Mitsubishi Heavy Industries RJ Aviation Group’s (MHIRJ) CRJ1000 and Mitsubishi Aircraft Corp.’s SpaceJet M90. From a passenger capacity perspective, the 114- and 124-seat capacity of the first-generation E190 and E195 fall in between the capacities of the CRJ1000/M90 and the A220 series, while the increased capacity of the E195-E2 makes it more competitive to the larger A220-300. From a performance perspective, the first-generation E190 and E195 airframes also fall in between those aforementioned airframes, with the E2 variants again making those airframes more competitive with the clean-sheet A220-100 and -300.

Aside from the A220 series—for which Airbus does not include takeoff and landing performance data in promotional materials—performance-based comparisons can also be made between the E190 and E195 and the CRJ1000 and M90. Based on the particular type’s maximum takeoff weight (MTOW), sea-level altitude and standard conditions, the takeoff field lengths of both the E190LR and E195LR are lower than the comparable figure for the CRJ1000 (6,670 ft.), while the E190AR and E195AR exceed that figure. However, the landing field length of those four first-generation E-Jet variants—assuming each airframe’s maximum landing weight (MLW), sea-level altitude and standard conditions—is less than the 5,740-ft. distance touted by Bombardier. Furthermore, despite being certified to higher maximum weights, the E190-E2 and E195-E2 both have takeoff and landing field lengths that are shorter than the CRJ1000.

Conversely, the takeoff field length of the M90 (5,710 ft.) is expected to be an improvement on the comparable figures for the pre-E2 E190 and E195 variants. However, the same takeoff performance figure for the E190-E2 is more than 400 ft. less than what is anticipated for the M90. Additionally, the landing field lengths of both generations of the E190 and E195 represent improvements in comparison to the performance figure promoted for the M90 (4,860 ft.).

Comparison: E190/E195 and Competing Airframes

Commercial Designation

E190-E2

E195-E2

CRJ1000

A220-100

A220-300

M90

Maximum Capacity

114

146

104

127

145

92

Range (nm)

2,850

2,600

1,650

3,450

3,400

2,040

Engines (2x)

Pratt & Whitney

General Electric CF34

Pratt & Whitney

PW1919G

PW1922G

PW1921G PW1923G

PW1923G-A

-8C5

-8C5A1

-8C5A2

PW1519G

PW1521GA

PW1524G

PW1521G-3

PW1524G-3

PW1200G

Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW)(lb.)

124,340

135,585

91,800

134,000

149,000

94,358

Maximum Landing Weight (lb.)

108,136

119,050

81,500

115,500

129,500

83,776

Although the performance figures of the E190 and E195 do differ in a number of ways, all variants of the ERJ 190—including the -300 and -400—share a common maximum operating limit speed (MMO) of 0.82 Mach from 28,887 ft. to 41,000 ft. That latter altitude also represents the maximum operating altitude, a limitation that is shared by the E170 and E175. Another limitation that is shared with the ERJ 170-based airframes is the maximum operating altitude for takeoff and landing, with the first-generation E190 and E195 limited to 10,000 ft. However, if the modifications included in service bulletin (SB) 190-35-0005 are performed, that altitude limitation is increased to 14,000 ft.

Given the differences between the AR and LR variants of both the E190 and E195, the published performance figures for those airframes differ as well. For instance, the E190AR and LR are promoted as having takeoff field lengths—based on the MTOW of those variants, standard conditions, sea-level altitude and CF34-10E5A1 (E190AR) and -10E5 (E190LR) engines—of 6,890 ft. and 6,004 ft., respectively. The comparative landing field lengths—assuming MLW, standard conditions and sea-level altitude—differ by slightly less than 60 ft. at 4,081 ft. and 4,022 ft. The 2,450-nm range of the E190AR and 2,400-nm range of the E190LR assume an airframe configured in a single-class configuration and incorporating seats that have a 32-in. pitch— with all of those seats occupied and a passenger weight of 220 lb.—as well as being operated at the long-range cruise speed and when carrying “typical mission reserves.” Finally, the time to climb to 35,000 ft.—assuming an airplane that has a takeoff weight for a 500-nm flight and which is fully loaded with passengers—is the same 16 min. that is advertised for the E170.

The comparable figures for the E195AR and LR are based on mostly the same criteria as those for the E190, with the respective takeoff field lengths noted as being 7,149 ft. and 6,535 ft. The landing field lengths of those variants differ by less than 50 ft.—4,183 ft. (E195AR) and 4,134 ft. (E195LR)—while the published range of these E-Jets differs by 300 nm. To that end, the E195AR is capable of operating to a range of 2,300 nm, while the E195LR reduces that figure to 2,000 nm. As is the case with the E190, these variants of the E195 are both marketed as being able to climb to 35,000 ft. in the same amount of time (18 min.).

While the 41,000-ft. maximum operating altitude of the first-generation E190/E195 is retained, the E190-E2 and E195-E2 both increase the maximum altitude for takeoff and landing to the 14,000-ft. limit that is only possible on the first E190 and E195 variants when the aforementioned SB is applied. Based on the same criteria noted above—with the exception of the takeoff distance being based on a standard engine—the performance of the E190-E2 includes a takeoff field length of 5,298 ft. and landing field length of 3,987 ft. With a higher MTOW and MLW, the comparable figures for the E195-E2 are 5,922 ft. and 4,232 ft. Finally, the ranges of the E190-E2 and E195-2—assuming mostly the same criteria—are 2,850 nm and 2,600 nm, respectively. For the second-generation variants of the ERJ 190, the assumptions for those range figures are the same as for the previous variants except that a 100-nm alternate is included and the single-class configuration that is used is not specified. Beyond the maximum-range figure noted above, the E190-E2 is also promoted as having improved range when operating out of airports with short runways, as well as those at high altitudes and in hot conditions. When compared to the “current-generation aircraft” at the time, Embraer states that the range of that E2 when operating from London City is raised “by more than 1,000 nm.” The company also states that the range from high-altitude and hot-temperature airports such as Denver and Mexico City is improved by 600 nm, while the E195-E2’s performance from “restricted fields” is promoted as being enhanced, with an additional 900 nm of range possible from Denver and 500 nm more possible from Rio de Janeiro Santos Dumont Airport.

Variants

E190 Specifications

Type Designation

ERJ 190-100 STD

ERJ 190-100 LR

ERJ 190-100 IGW

ERJ 190-100 SR

Commercial Designation

E190STD

E190LR

E190AR

E190SR

Maximum Passenger  Capacity

114

98

Range (nm)

 

2,400

2,450

 

Engines (2x)

General Electric CF34

-10E5ô-10E5A1 ô-10E6 ô-10E6A1 ô-10E7

-10E5A1ô-10E7

Basic Operating Weight (lb.)*

61,509

 

Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW)(lb.)

105,359

110,892

114,199

110,892

Maximum Landing Weight (lb.)

94,799

97,003

94,799

Maximum Payload (lb.)*

28,440

28,660

 

Wingspan

94 ft. 3 in.

Wing Area

996 ft.2

Length

118 ft. 11 in.

Height

34 ft. 7 in.

*In a typical standard configuration

E195 Specifications

Type Designation

ERJ 190-200 STD

ERJ 190-200 LR

ERJ 190-200 IGW

Commercial Designation

E195STD

E195LR

E195AR

Maximum Passenger Capacity

124

Range (nm)

 

2,000

2,300

Engines (2x)

General Electric CF34

-10E5ô-10E5A1ô-10E6ô-10E6A1ô-10E7

Basic Operating Weight (lb.)*

63,273

Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW)(lb.)

107,564

111,973

115,280

Maximum Landing Weight (lb.)

99,208

100,972

Maximum Payload (lb.)*

30,424

30,644

Wingspan

94 ft. 3 in.

Wing Area

996 ft.2

Length

126 ft. 10 in.

Height

34 ft. 7 in.

         *In a standard configuration

E190-E2 and E195-E2 Specifications

Type Designation

ERJ 190-300

ERJ 190-400

Commercial Designation

E190-E2

E195-E2

Maximum Passenger Capacity

114

146

Range (nm)

2,850

2,600

Engines (2X)

Pratt & Whitney

PW1919GôPW1922G

PW1921GôPW1923Gô

PW1923G-A

Basic Operation Weight (lb.)*

72,752

78,815

Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW)(lb.)

124,340

135,585

Maximum Landing Weight (lb.)

108,136

119,050

Wingspan

110 ft. 7.6 in.

115 ft. 2.7 in.

Wing Area

1,108.68 ft.2

Length

118 ft. 11 in.

136 ft. 5.76 in.

Height

35 ft. 11.2 in.

35 ft. 4.4 in.

         *In a typical standard configuration

GE CF34-10 Engines

All first-generation E190 and E195 variants are powered by a pair of General Electric (GE) CF34-10E engines. Described by GE Aviation as being in the 20,000-lb. thrust class of turbofan engines and representing “a considerable capability increase over the other CF34 engine models,” four of the five certified variants—the CF34-10E5, -10E5A1, -10E6 and -10E6A1—have a common maximum takeoff thrust rating of 18,820 lb., while the CF34-10E7 increases that limitation to 20,360 lb. Furthermore, all five of those engine variants share a common maximum continuous thrust rating of 17,040 lb., while the normal takeoff thrust rating is either 17,390 lb. (-10E5 and -10E6) or 18,820 lb. (-10E5A1, -10E6A1 and -10E7). According to the engine manufacturer, the variants of the CF34-10E that power the E190 and E195 are promoted as emitting a noise level that “meets or surpasses” the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) Chapter 4 standards, with the level of emissions produced meeting or surpassing the Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection’s CAEP/6 standards. Marketed as featuring “technologies from other large commercial engines” produced by GE and CFM International, GE also states that they “provide the total CF34-10E propulsion system for the [E190/E195], including the nacelle/thrust reverser and Engine-Buildup Unit (EBU) components for underwing installation.”

E190 and E195

As is noted above, Embraer has certified four variants of the ERJ 190-100 that serves as the basis for the E190, with a fifth variant—the ERJ 190-100 ECJ—marketed as the Lineage 1000/1000E business jet. Beyond the MTOW and MLW noted above, Embraer notes that the E190AR, LR and STD have basic operating weights—based on a typical standard configuration—of 61,509 lb., while the maximum payload is either 28,440 lb. (E190STD and E190LR) and 28,660 lb. (E190AR).

A steep-approach variant of the E190, designated the ERJ 190-100 SR and marketed as the E190SR, was launched in 2008 with an order from British Airways. Prior to the January 2010 certification of the E190SR, Embraer conducted steep-approach testing in 2009 at London City Airport. Beyond evaluating the steep-approach capabilities of the E190, that testing also involved “compatibility testing for noise, parking and servicing.” British Airways’ E190SRs are operated by the company’s BA CityFlyer subsidiary and based at London City Airport, with the first airframe delivered on March 4, 2010.

Other differences between the first-generation E190 and E195 variants—beyond the passenger capacity and performance-related distinctions—include cargo volume, weights and dimensions. Weights that are increased on the E195 include the basic operating weight—with the standard E195AR, LR and STD in the standard configuration having a basic operating weight of 63,237 lb.—and maximum payload, with the latter increased, according to Embraer’s airport planning manual for the E195, to either 30,424 lb. (E195STD and LR) or 30,644 lb. (E195AR).

Pratt & Whitney GTF Engine

The E190-E2 and E195-E2 are distinguished not only by increased maximum weights and passenger capacities, but also by the engines that power those airplanes. In contrast to the CF34 engines that power the first-generation E-Jets, the E-Jet E2 variants are powered by a pair of Pratt & Whitney GTF engines that are high-bypass-ratio, axial-flow, dual-spool turbofan engines. As is noted above, variants of PW1900G are certified to power both the E190-E2 and E195-E2, with those engines providing benefits in emissions, fuel consumption and the noise generated. According to Pratt & Whitney, those benefits include noise footprint and nitrogen oxide (NOX) emissions (from CAEP/6) that are reduced by “up to” 75% and 50%, respectively, as well as fuel consumption figures that are lowered by “double-digit[s].” Specific features of the PW1900G-series engines certified for the E190 and E195-E2 include a single-stage fan that has a 73-in. diameter, 12:1 bypass ratio and which is driven by a low-pressure turbine (LPT) “through a fan-drive gear-speed-reduction system.” The LPT also directly drives the engine’s low-pressure compressor (LPC) which has three stages, with the fan, LPC and LPT all part of the engine’s low-pressure spool, according to the FAA TCDS. A two-stage high-pressure turbine that is cooled drives the engine’s eight-axial-stage high-pressure compressor, while the engine itself is controlled by a full authority digital engine control (FADEC) system. The maximum takeoff thrust ratings—sea-level static thrust—of the five PW1900G variants that are certified for the E190-E2 and E195-E2 range from 22,550 lb. (PW1919G) to 24,110 lb. (PW1921G, PW1923G and PW1923G-A), with the 23,815-lb. rating of the PW1922G falling in between. As is also noted above, the PW1919G and PW1922G are the certified engines for the E190-E2, while the PW1921G, PW1923G and PW1923G-A are approved to power the E195-E2.

E190 and E195-E2

Although the E190-E2 retains the same passenger capacity as the first-generation E190, that E2 variant features an MTOW increase—in comparison to the E190AR—of nearly 10,000 lb. Other changes incorporated into the E2 include new landing gear and a high-aspect-ratio wing, the previously discussed fourth-generation FBW flight-control system, changes to the leading and trailing-edge devices on the wings, systems that are 75% new and a “redesigned fuselage structure.” With regard to changes to the wing’s trailing-edge devices, while the first E190 and E195 airframes use double-slotted flaps—which are noted as creating more drag, as well as being “more complex to move and maintain”—all E2 variants are equipped with single-slotted flaps. Another aerodynamic change involves the use of the leading-edge slats, which are “used aerodynamically on the E2 more than on the” first-generation airframes. The high-aspect-ratio wing found on the E190-E2, which is made of aluminum, is noted as having “the highest aspect ratio of any [wing on a] large commercial aircraft.” Supplementing the structural improvements to the airframe, Embraer has also stated that the fuel burn of the E190-E2 was found to be 17.3% lower than the first-generation E190, representing a 1.3% improvement on the company’s original expectations of a “16% fuel burn improvement.” At the time that the airframe was rolled out in 2016, it was noted that the bulk of that improvement would come from the Pratt & Whitney engines, with the wing’s aerodynamics and the FBW control system also contributing.

From an environmental perspective, the E190-E2 is promoted by Embraer for the low level of its emissions and external noise, with that airframe’s margin to ICAO’s Stage IV noise standard being 20 EPNdB. The company further states that the E190-E2’s lack of a calendar limitation on utilization—as well as 10,000-hr. maintenance interval “for basic checks”—gives operators “an additional 15 days of aircraft utilization over” a decade in comparison to the first-generation E-Jets.

The largest airplane produced by Embraer is the E195-E2, with that airframe’s bespoke aluminum wing described by the company as being the “largest high-aspect-ratio metallic wing in production on a commercial airliner,” a wing that has a “different, longer wingtip section.” During the airframe’s development, the size of wing was increased, a change that resulted in a 450 nm increase in the design range, for a total range, at the time, of 2,450 nm. Despite that increase in wing size—announced in February 2016—the March 2017 first flight of the E195-E2 took place ahead of schedule. In comparison to the first-generation E195, the E2’s longer fuselage means that it can accommodate three additional rows of seats. Despite the fact that the E195-E2’s wing is “aerodynamically similar to the E190-E2’s,” the former variant’s wing is distinguished by its “longer wingtip section” and the structural modifications that were made to it. During the airframe’s flight-test program, the E195-E2 was able to achieve a fuel burn reduction—on a per-seat basis and in comparison to the first-generation E195—of 25.4%, an improvement that Embraer noted as being “1.4% lower than expected.”

Program Status/Operators

In addition to being the location of Embraer’s headquarters and where the first flight of each E-Jet series airframe has taken place, Sao Jose dos Campos is also where Embraer produces all of the company’s commercial airframes. With regard to flight testing, a total of four flight-test airframes were involved in the E190 test program, with the second of those airplanes performing its first flight on May 9, 2004. As was the case with the E190-E2 and E195-E2’s fuel-burn figures, Embraer announced, subsequent to the certification of the first-generation E195, that the figures for the airframe “were 3% better than originally planned.” The first E195 was delivered to European operator Flybe—the launch customer for the variant—in September 2006.

Similar to the first E190, the E190-E2 certification program involved four airframes which accrued “a total of 2,200 flight hr.,” while the E195-E2 was assigned two flight-test airplanes. Of the two E195-E2 test airframes, one was used for “aerodynamic and performance tests,” while the other was utilized “for the interior and validation of maintenance tasks.”

On July 5, 2018, Embraer announced that they had signed a memorandum of understanding with Boeing to create a joint venture involving the former company’s commercial aircraft and services business. The result of that agreement—which was approved by Embraer’s shareholders on Feb. 26, 2019—would have had “Boeing hold[ing] an 80% ownership stake in the joint venture,” with Embraer owning the other 20%. While the completion of the deal was expected to occur “by the end of 2019”—with Embraer’s commercial aircraft business to be rebranded as Boeing Brasil – Commercial—Boeing announced on April 25, 2020, that the company had terminated the “Master Transaction Agreement” that it had made with Embraer. The result of that termination was the cancellation of joint ventures for both Embraer’s commercial business and the Brazilian company’s C-390 multi-mission transport airplane. Boeing noted at the time of the termination of the agreement that the joint venture had “received unconditional approval from all necessary regulatory authorities, with the exception of the European Commission.” Despite the termination of the deal, the type certificate that includes both the ERJ 190 and ERJ 170 types is still held by Yabora Industria Aeronautica S.A.

References

  • AWIN Article Archives
  • Embraer, General Electric, Honeywell and Pratt & Whitney Commercial Materials
  • ANAC TCDS (ERJ 170 and ERJ 190)
  • EASA TCDS (ERJ 190)
  • FAA TCDS (ERJ 190, CF34 and PW1900G)
Channel
Commercial Aviation
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Commercial
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